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Sumac Powder
Ground, dried leaves of a small tree native to the Mediterranean, Rhus coriaria. This has been used for tanning leather for centuries, producing a yellowish-green colour. It was once widely used in the woolen trade to produce shades of brown through tan to yellow-brown and olive and is sometimes called Tanner's Sumac. Used mainly on protein fibres but worth experimenting with on cotton and other plant fibres. We can't find much information, but suggesting trying this at 20-30% WOF for medium shades, as a starting point.. TO USE: soak in warm water overnight. Simmer in liquid 30-60 minutes at 170-190°F. Cool, strain, add more water if necessary then simmer premordanted fibre for 30-60 minutes at 170-190°F. Lower temperatures (below 160°F) may help the yellow pigments to shine through, and keep down the brown tones. Light and washfastness: probably good to excellent with a mordant.
$6.60$27.00 Select options
Tannic acid
Tannic acid
Used mainly on as a MORDANT on cellulose fibres such as cotton, usually in combination with Alum. TO USE: weigh dry fibre. Calculate mordant required at 15% WOF (weight of fibre) each of Tannic Acid and Alum. Weigh mordants and dissolve in hot water in separate plastic or non-reactive containers. Add wetted fibre to Alum solution and soak for 12 to 24 hours. Rinse and place in Tannic Acid solution for 12 to 24 hours. Rinse again and place back in Alum solution for 12 to 24 hours. Wash and rinse well, then dye or dry for later use. Spent mordant solution may be safely disposed of down the drain (except for septic systems). It also may be poured around garden plants that prefer acidic soil conditions. CAUTION: wear a mask when handling powders. Wear gloves when using tannic acid, particularly when rinsing or handling wet yarns as it can cause skin burns or irritation.
$5.83$23.85 Select options
Thiourea Dioxide
Thiourea Dioxide
Sometimes called Thiox. Used in the INDIGO VAT dye process, thiox removes oxygen from the vat solution, allowing the indigo to work its magic. Thiox is also a colour remover, and is used for that purpose in discharge dyeing, to create white patterns on a coloured background. TO USE: Follow the specific indigo vat recipe, for amounts and timing. Dispose of spent dyebath in the usual way, most likely down the drain. Thiourea dioxide has a shelf life but it's longer than some things you read might indicate. If the powder has a distinctive yellow look, it has probably oxidized to some degree and may no longer be effective. Store in a cool, dry place out of the light i.e. in a cupboard in the house, not out in the garage. CAUTION: Should be done OUTDOORS ONLY or with excellent ventilation. Avoid breathing fumes. Wear a mask when handling powders. Wear gloves.
$7.67$31.46 Select options
The Fibre Garden
Tin Mordant
Used as a MORDANT in natural dyeing, which allows the plant pigments to bond with the fibres. Tin (Stannous chloride) brightens colours and really makes them "pop". However, it is one of the trickier mordants to use, and rather expensive. Some dyers prefer to premordant with tin, while many simply add "a pinch" at the end of the dye process, and heat the fibre for another fifteen minutes or so, cool and then rinse as usual. The amount recommended for this is only 25% of the usual premordanting amounts, below. Used mainly on protein fibres such as wool, alpaca, silk. Tin can make fibre feel harsh and brittle, so do not exceed the recommended amounts. Yarns can also easily scorch during tin premordanting. Do not pack the pot too full of fibre! An upturned rack, marbles or stones can help keep yarns off the bottom of your pot. TO USE: Weigh fibre. Calculate mordant required for .5 to 2% WOF (weight of fibre). Weigh tin and dissolve in hot water. Fill pot with sufficient water for the fibre to move, add tin and stir. Enter fibre. Bring to 180-200°F and hold 1 hour. Stir yarns frequently. Cool, remove fibre and wash well. Dye immediately or dry for later. Some dyers add cream of tartar at 5-10% WOF with tin. Spent mordant solution may be safely disposed of by pouring in a gravel driveway or path. CAUTION: wear a mask when handling powders. Wear gloves when using tin, as it can be absorbed by the skin. BEST DONE OUTDOORS or with very good ventilation. Avoid breathing fumes.
$9.70$39.29 Select options
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Titanium oxalate
Used as a MORDANT in natural dyeing, which allows the plant pigments to bond with the fibres. Titanium is used both on protein and cellulose fibres, giving vibrant orange and gold tones when dyes contain tannins. As a mordant, this is relatively new and not much information abounds in books or even online. It may be the closest thing now available to replace chrome, which nobody much uses any longer. TO USE: weigh the dry fibre or yarn. Calculate mordant required for 8 to 15% WOF (weight of fibre). Dissolve in hot water. Fill pot with sufficient water for the fibre to move, add titanium and stir. Enter fibre. Bring to 180-200 degrees F and hold 1 hour. Stir yarns frequently. Cool, remove fibre and wash well. Dye immediately or dry for later. Some interesting results are being produced doing Eco-Printing on fabric, using Titanium as a mordant. We cannot seem to find much information on safe disposal of a Titanium mordant bath. Nothing we've found indicates it to be particularly toxic or harmful to plumbing or sewer systems, but to be on the safe side it may be best to dispose of this outdoors on a gravel driveway or similar place. CAUTION: wear a mask when handling powders. Wear gloves when rinsing or handling wet yarns. BEST DONE OUTDOORS or with very good ventilation. Avoid breathing fumes.
$19.80$81.00 Select options
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Walnut Crystals
Crystals derived somehow or other from, we presume, walnut hulls. Some online sites claim the source is actually peat moss, but we doubt it. Walnut crystals are are widely used by craftsmen as a water-soluble stain for fine furniture, and also by fabric and paper artists. Useful on protein fibres and possibly on cotton and other cellulose fibres, since these no doubt contain a goodly amount of natural tannins. Expect shades of rich brown through tan, depending on the dye solution strength. Substantive but pre-mordanting is recommended. Use at 15-25% weight of fibre for medium shades, more if desired.TO USE: dissolve crystals in boiling water then add to dye pot. Enter fibre and simmer at 185-200°F for 1 to 1.5 hours. Light and washfastness: good to excellent. NOTE: Clean pots and utensils well, this dye tends to stain. WEAR GLOVES or your hands will be brown for a week.
$5.67$23.17 Select options
Weld, Dried Chopped
Weld, Dried Chopped
Dried and chopped tops from Reseda luteola. Use on protein or cellulose fibres. An ancient source of excellent bright yellows. Pre-mordanting recommended. Alum/c.o.t. mordant gives good results. Use at 30-50% WOF for medium shades. TO USE: soak in water overnight, then simmer mixture at 160-175°F for 1 hour. Cool and strain. Add more water if needed and enter pre-mordanted fibre. Hold at a 160-175°F for one hour. The brightest yellows develop at these cool temperatures. Light & washfastness: very good.
$5.75$19.00 Select options